Partnership For Progress

image

Frequently Asked Questions

Many questions about Willow Heights are answered in the Resident Handbook which is posted in the Downloadable Resources section of this web site.

Q: What do I have to do to be admitted to Willow Heights or one of the other programs offered by Partnership for Progress?

A: It is very helpful if you have a case manager or social worker helping you with the process.  However, the first step is to look over the admission criteria and application requirements sheets that are posted in the document section of this website.  Fill out an application and return it to us either by e-mail, fax, or US mail along with the other information required.  Our staff will look over your information and make a decision as to whether or not we think we can meet your needs.  We require an on-site visit prior to admitting anyone to Willow Heights.  Only individuals who have previously been placed at Willow Heights or who are otherwise well known to us are served in our supported community living program.  Anyone over the age of 16 who has a mental illness diagnosis may apply to our day program, Journey.

Q: How much does it cost to live at Willow Heights?

A: Right now the full cost for a day is $90.05.  If you are private pay you will be responsible for the whole amount.  If you receive Social Security Disability and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and you have Medicaid (Title 19), the Department of Human Services will set the amount you are responsible for which is called Client Participation (CP).  Typically CP is all but $103.00 of your SSDI/SSI income.  Medicaid pays the balance of the room and board portion of the daily rate.  The county of legal settlement pays the service portion-$60-of the daily rate.

Q: Who pays for SCL or Day Program services?

A:  Each of those services is accredited for HCBS Habilitation funding.  County or private pay funding is also a possibility, but at the same rate as Habilitation.  The Habilitation rates are generally set by cost report and can change from year to year.

Q: How long will I need to stay at Willow Heights?

A: The short answer is, “That depends.”  Each person is different with individualized strengths and needs.  Most people who come to us either have failed to develop the skills necessary for successful independent living or have had those skills and lost them because of serious and persistent bouts of mental illness.  You will need to remain at Willow Heights until you can safely and successfully move on. For some that is three months and for others it is several years.

Q: What can I bring when I come to Willow Heights?

A: Rooms are about the size of college dorm rooms so you should only bring things you really need such as clothing that fits, personal care items, a television, radio, or small stereo.  We furnish the room with a bed that has two drawers built in, a night stand and a chair.  We also furnish pillows, bed linens, towels, and wash cloths.  You may bring your own dresser and chair if you wish and we can remove our chair and nightstand.

Q: Can I carry my own money?

A:  There are several things that can make a difference in how this question is answered.  If you have a Representative Payee or Conservator, they have a say in what you can do with your money.  At Willow Heights the administrative assistant handles the resident trust account and helps individuals with their budgeting and shopping needs.  Those who keep money in the resident trust account may request money on Tuesday and Friday afternoons.  We recommend that no one carry large amounts of cash because of the possibility of loss or theft.  We also recommend that everyone learn to shop from a list to help with wise decision making.  Most people receiving SCL services have their own checkbooks and dual signature accounts.

Q: Can I smoke?

A: At Willow Heights you may only smoke outside in the back of the building.  Cigarette butts are to be placed in the metal receptacle provided.  The rules are that you are not allowed to buy or borrow cigarettes from others or sell or lend cigarettes to others. Persons receiving SCL services are asked to refrain from smoking during service visits.  Smoking is allowed on the back patio at day program between sessions and at break times.  Cigarette butts are to be placed in the receptacles provided.

Q: Can I leave Willow Heights whenever I want to?

A: During the first two weeks of placement we require everyone to remain at the facility unless they are attending an outing with staff.  That way you get acquainted with staff and the other residents and become familiar with facility policies and rules.  Family may come and visit during the two weeks but you may not leave with them.  After the initial two-week period whether or not you can leave depends on if you are court committed to the facility, if you have a guardian and what is in your program plan.  Anyone who is court committed to the facility must have written permission from their service coordinator or administration any time they leave the facility unless they are accompanied by staff.  Those with guardians need to have guidelines set by the guardian regarding passes.  Because of behavior problems some residents must earn pass privileges according to their program plans.  Whenever any resident leaves the facility without staff accompaniment they must sign out and sign back in when they return.

Q: Can I go and stay overnight with my family if I live at Willow Heights or if I receive SCL services?

A:  Yes.  If you live at Willow Heights and are a Medicaid recipient, Medicaid rules say you can only be gone overnight 30 times a year.  Outings with family or friends that do not involve overnight stays do not count.  If you live in the community and receive SCL services, you need to notify your staff ahead of time so they can alter your service schedule.

Q: What makes Journey different from other day programs?

A: Journey is specifically designed to help persons with chronic mental illness build the skills they need to achieve, regain, or maintain a significant level of independence.  We strive to provide a fun and socially stimulating atmosphere, but social activities are not the focus of our program.

 

Print this page